solo piano transcription

  • Three new composers. One big update.

    We're back with another big update! This week, we're welcoming three new composers to the site: tenor saxophonist Paul Quinichette, cornetist Ruby Braff and bassist Santi Debriano. Our Recording Session Anniversaries this week celebrates the anniversary of the first recording of Gigi Gryce's Capri with new lead sheets in the original key -- including two Clifford Brown trumpet solos; the recording sessions for Kenny Drew Jr.'s album "A Look Inside" (Alhambra, A Look Inside); Ray Bryant's legendary performance at Montreaux; and Ruby Braff's recording session for his album "Braff!" on which Here's Freddie was recorded.

    We're also celebrating birthdays: vocalist Rachel Gould, pianist Elmo Hope and bassist Santi Debriano. Join us in marking all of these anniversaries and birthdays with great music!

    Check out this week's new music:

    GIGI GRYCECapri  Now available in the original key with two Clifford Brown trumpet solos

    KENNY DREW JRAlhambra A lyrical, flowing bossa

    KENNY DREW JR: A Look Inside A cheerful & bubbly medium swing

    RAY BRYANT: Blues #3 Master the blues in G with this three-chorus piano solo transcription

    RAY BRYANT: Blues #2 A blues tour-de-force: seven choruses of piano solo transcription

    PAUL QUINICHETTE: Prevue A simply & catchy medium swing that makes a great choice for vocalists. Paul Quinichette's tenor sax solo transcription available.

    RUBY BRAFF: Here's Freddie Classic, laid-back mainstream jazz

    SANTI DEBRIANO: Abra Cadabra A bright Latin piece

    Have you seen our new inline audio player? It's a simple blue box that appears in our text notes whenever we want to feature a sample in the middle of text. If you come across a blue box with a triangle on it like this , click it and listen to the music!

    Make sure to click on the dots under the home page slider; we've put some fun ways to look at this week's music there. 
    Enjoy the music!
  • New composers and new music all summer long

    We hope you're enjoying the new website. With our reboot behind us, we're back to focusing on what matters the most: the music. To start the summer off right, we're releasing new music every week. This week, we're proud to welcome composers Adriano Acea, Jon Gordon and John Webber to the site. We also have lead sheets and transcriptions of trumpeter Art Farmer, pianist Geoffrey Keezer and drummers Bill Stewart and Carl Allen to round out a selection that has something for everyone. Don't forget to check out our homepage for new videos and other featured content -- click the dots under the slider to see all the new material, updated weekly.

    Here's what's new on jazzleadsheets.com:

    Art Farmer - Flashback Get inside this medium swing, featuring Art Farmer's solo transcription, Geoff Keezer's piano solo and melody comping transcriptions, and Carl Allen's drum comping transcription

    Tom McIntosh - With Malice Toward None Appealing, adaptable with a touch of soul. Available in two different keys.

    Jon Gordon - Shape Up Intricate, contemporary and rhythmically complex. With Bill Stewart's drum comping and solo transcriptions and a video of Bill.

    Jon Webber - So Young An introspective and quirky ballad with second parts.

    Adriano Acea - Little Leona An enticing Latin/swing hybrid.

    Enjoy the music, Don Sickler and the jazzleadsheets.com team

  • Two new composers 12/10/10

    —- Jackleg - Jack Wilson If you aren’t familiar with Jack Wilson, listen to our audio excerpt. There’s only a small handful of jazz pianists with technique like Jack! This isn’t his only side, and we’ll be exploring more of his great compositions in the near future. For now, check out his dexterity at the keyboard and try his composition for yourself. Obviously, it works great at a slower tempo, too. We also have his transcribed piano solo available.

    —- La Villa - Kenny Dorham Kenny Dorham is one of the true masters of rhythm section writing. Because of that, many of his compositions can’t be reduced to a single line lead sheet: often, each member of the rhythm section requires their own individual part. Although La Villa has a counter melody bass part, we’ve decided to incorporate that bass part into our C treble clef lead sheet. We’re also putting out two editions: the first, as recorded on Kenny’s Afro-Cuban album (1955), and the second, from his Jazz Contrasts album (1957). You can read more about these specific arrangements by clicking on the link above.

    Max Roach, the drummer on the Jazz Contrasts album, continued to perform La Villa with his own groups. In 1958, he recorded it with Booker Little, trumpet; George Coleman, tenor sax; and Ray Draper, tuba. This recording is available on a Clifford Brown / Max Roach compilation and is mistitled as "Villa" on iTunes. The trumpeter is incorrectly listed as Clifford Brown instead of Booker little. On Amazon the composition is titled correctly, but the artist is listed again as Clifford Brown. Max made two recordings of La Villa in 1960, both featuring Julian Priester (trombone) and the two Turrentine brothers, Tommy (trumpet) and Stanley (tenor sax). On this session, La Villa is mistitled as "The Villa." Here is another example of La Villa mistitled agai, this time as "Stop Motion." These three great recordings are at true Max Roach tempos (fast!). The 1958 performance increases the tempo of the quarter note to approximately 356, and the other recordings are only a little more relaxed.

    More great Hank Mobley and Bobby Timmons and Ray Bryant

    Pat’N Chat - Hank Mobley I’ve had several requests for this one, so here it is. This has always been one of my favorites to play myself. One of the most interesting things to me about Hank Mobley’s composing is that he wrote his music for the specific musicians on the date. I know this for a fact, because Hank told me this personally. It’s most evident by examining the drummer on the date. From jazzleadsheets.com alone, just check out, for example, the obviously-for-Philly-Joe titles = Workout, Out Of Joe’s Bag, the No Room For Squares album, A Peck A Sec, etc. Then there are the obviously-for-Art-Blakey titles = the Soul Station album, the Roll Call album, High Modes, this week’s Chicken An’ Dumpins, etc. With his Turnaround album, Hank starts a recording relationship with a new (and very important to him) drummer, Billy Higgins. Billy had come to New York from his native California in the early 1960s. He’d recorded with many of Hank’s friends, but not yet with Hank. Pat ‘N Chat was the first track they recorded together, and immediately you can tell Hank is writing for an entirely different drum voice: obviously-for-Billy-Higgins. I’ll be telling you more about Hank and Billy as we release more of their collaborations.

    —- A Little Busy - Bobby Timmons Here are two different arrangements by Timmons: his trio arrangement and the sextet arrangement he did for Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers. These arrangements were recorded in different keys, and believe it or not, were recorded only one day apart by two entirely different groups (except for Bobby). Bobby’s incredible piano solo from the trio recording is also available.

    —- Chicken An’ Dumplins - Ray Bryant Another great arrangement, written for Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers by Ray Bryant. Ray’s good friend and fellow Philadelphia pianist Bobby Timmons introduced this one to Blakey. Ray’s solo piano arrangement as well as Kenny Drew, Jr.’s recording of the solo is also available.

    I hope you enjoy playing these new titles. Don Sickler

  • 5 new titles, with alto sax, trumpet and piano solos

    Nica’s Tempo is a significant Gigi Gryce composition that he revisited several times during his career. We’ve posted lead sheets for two different quintet arrangements by Gigi that were recorded almost 5 years apart, and I’ve explained some important differences between the two. Melody and second parts are available for both. Also, Gryce’s and Farmer’s solos are available, both great studies in improvisation. Trumpet players, especially newer players, should get a lot out of studying both the Art Farmer and Gigi Gryce (B-flat edition) solos. Alto solos transposed to B-flat generally don’t go too high, giving trumpet soloists who haven’t yet developed their high range new ideas in a lower register.

    Elmo Hope was one of Monk’s favorite composers. It’s fascinating to follow his compositional history since his style of writing changed over the years. I feel it’s important to start with his earlier works, like Happy Hour. We’ll post a few more over the next weeks, then get into the later period.

    January 2010 marks the 50th anniversary of Bobby Timmons’s recording career as a leader. Although we’re starting with a 1961 session here, with Easy Does It, we’ll get to his 1960 gems to commemorate their 50th anniversary later this year. Check out our first transcribed piano solo, Bobby’s six piano choruses on five pages. Timmons’ solos should be available for study. He’s always so full of energy, movement and swing. We’ve really made an attempt to indicate his articulations, which are so much a part of his playing. He can create a great funky feel, or just swing like hell. Either way, he doesn’t hold back, he’s always generating his own type of energy. He exhibits the qualities of a true artist: he always sounds like “Bobby Timmons.”

    We’ve already given you two of Ray Bryant’s Latin-jazz classics: Cubano Chant and Cuban Fantasy, but we also want you to hear Reflection. We’ve posted two different recordings, one by Ray himself, and one by his friend, pianist Phineas Newborn. Fun to compare the two approaches.

    Tina Brooks had the soulful trumpeter Johnny Coles at his side for “The Waiting Game” session, and I’m sure Johnny Coles loved this one. Dhyana is soulful and definitely swinging.

    Thanks for visiting jazzleadsheets.com! --Don Sickler

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