Gerald Wiggins

  • 50th anniversary titles & more

    This week marks the 50th anniversary of two great recording sessions for Riverside Records. On January 11, 1960, Julian Priester recorded his “Keep Swingin’” album, and on January 13 and 14, Bobby Timmons recorded his trio date “This Here Is Bobby Timmons.” These 50th anniversary sessions were also each artist’s first album as leaders.

    From Julian Priester: The End (plus Julian’s trombone solo) Under The Surface (plus Julian’s trombone solo) I proofread the two Julian Priester arrangements with one of my combos at Columbia University this last semester, then performed both at the winter concert. The combo used the same instrumentation as the recording, except tenor sax played the melody and trombone played the second part. During the semester I had to sub for both tenor and trombone, on trumpet, so we also got to hear Trumpet/Tenor-2nd part and Trumpet/Trombone-2nd part. The arrangements work great with any instrumentation, or with just the melody part in a quartet format.

    I get a lot of requests from trombonists for transcribed solos. Julian Priester is not only a great composer, he’s also a great trombone soloist. As I mention in my description notes, Julian’s The End composition is a challenging form, as the rhythm switches between Latin and swing at initially unpredictable times. As you’ll see and hear, when Julian solos the transitions really make sense.

    From Bobby Timmons: Joy Ride Bobby Timmons was a very versatile composer at age 24, when he recorded the album “This Here Is Bobby Timmons.” He’d already written and recorded his two major hits in his own fully developed funky-churchy language, at 23. This trio date, his first as a leader, comes approximately one year and three months after Bobby first recorded Moanin’ with Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers, and a little less than three months after he recorded his second hit, This Here, as a member of the Cannonball Adderley Quintet. Jazzleadsheets.com will post This Here shortly, but for now, Joy Ride shows you Bobby is very much at home writing challenging boppish compositions.

    Additionally, the print arrangement of Moanin’ is available from Second Floor Music with full score and alternate parts. Order online at MusicDispatch.com.

    On top of these anniversary titles, we also have more Carl Perkins, from the Curtis Counce album “Carl’s Blues”: Carl is another “groove master,” and Carl’s Blues is in a great tempo (medium slow) and key (A-flat) that we all need to practice.

    In December 2009, we posted two arrangements of Gerald Wiggins’s A Fifth For Frank. One was from a Cal Tjader recording, with Gerald on piano. Gerald’s A Light Groove also comes from this album, it and gives you a different kind of “groove.”

    Let’s all Keep Swingin’! --Don Sickler

  • West Coast and East Coast

    West Coast bassist Curtis Counce’s album “Landslide” is represented by two compositions, one by pianist Carl Perkins, Mia, and one by pianist Gerald Wiggins, A Fifth For Frank. The album, if you don’t have it, is available from the Concord Music Group (also individual tracks). Plus, we’ve posted a second version of the Wiggins title, as recorded by Cal Tjader (also available from Concord). As Don points out in the description, comparing and playing the two versions is very instructive. Landslide by Harold Land, from the same album, will be up next.

    Also new to jazzleadsheets.com is composer/pianist Michael Cochrane from the NY/NJ area. Michael has played and recorded with Tom Harrell, Jack Walrath, Michael Brecker and many others. His composition Waltz No. 1 was recorded in a quintet format with Tom Harrell and Bob Malach. Flutist/lyricist Cheryl Pyle added a lyric, resulting in the beautiful Two Reflect As One, recorded by vocalist Gloria Cooper.

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